Angkor Wat – The Eastern Approach

When visiting Angkor Wat pretty much everyone will approach Angkor Wat from the long and impressive western causeway. And with reason. Two million people a year can’t be, and aren’t, wrong to do it that way.

It is awe inspiring to the point of being almost other-worldly, especially the first time, to gaze upon Angkor Wat in all its expansive grandeur from the beginning of the 352 meter western causeway. You wil be prone to flights of imagination as you come closer to the temple, step by step.

But, for your subsequent visit to Angkor Wat, and I heartily recommend one, even on your first trip, don’t forget you can use an eastern approach which has its own beauty and magic, as photographer and writer Dave Perkes writes in the Phnom Penh Post:

Looking for a peaceful and unusual route into Angkor Wat to avoid most of the crowds? A suggestion is to go via the eastern causeway that is mostly quiet in the low season. A morning approach is best, with the sunlight behind you. If you go through the eastern gateway, you get a nice view of the central tower framed by trees and, as you walk down the causeway, the rest of the five towers come into view. You will eventually see the entire eastern side in its full glory. Hopefully, you will get photos of this without the crowds. Continuing through the wood gate, you will see the centre tower and the large printed panels showing the Churning of the Ocean of Milk to your left. After visiting the central sanctuary, instead of following the path down the main causeway, head right to the north, where a path leads to the virtually unvisited Northern gate. In July the sun is to the north, so in late morning the north face of the gate is illuminated. If you have time, walk around the north and west of the walls along the moat, which is usually deserted, and exit by the western side. It’s a very tranquil experience.”

(Thinking of visiting the temples of Angkor Wat? Don’t forget to check out Savuth’s tuk tuk services!)

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~ by Leonard on July 30, 2009.

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